Slavko Miladinovic was born and raised in Kitchener-Waterloo (KW), Ontario to young Yugoslav immigrants from the Serb Republic (Republika Srpska).

His parents were rurally self-sufficient when they were growing up.  Thus, hands-on gardening and eviscerating pigs in KW was the norm for Miladinovic since five years of age.   He spent his weekends at the family cottage on Lake Erie during spring, summer and fall.  He was surrounded by new technology during his childhood as his mother, family and friends were working in KW’s high-tech sector.  When Miladinovic was thirteen years old he built a single integrated circuit AM radio for his science project, which later led to his interest and involvement in electronics and custom computer building to this day.

In his adolescence he had hands-on experience fixing cars with his father that later led to custom building high end homes in Waterloo Region, and running the family business while a high school student, whenever his parents would visit the US or Europe.


Miladinovic has experience in martial arts and ballistics training since a child.

In 1990, Miladinovic was in Yugoslavia during its transition to democracy.  As a result, he witnessed human rights denial of Krajina Serbs, whereby the fascist symbols during the holocaust re-emerged and Serbs were removed from Croatia’s constitution.  This led Krajina Serbs to invoke the UN right to self-determination and formed a self-government, which seceded from Croatian control. 

While in Bosnia, Miladinovic videotaped a Serb Democratic Party rally for the upcoming election.  The video was used in Canada to inform people of the transition to democracy.

The following year Miladinovic founded the KW Serbian Youth Council, which led to further activities with other organizations in North America and Europe. He experienced local, provincial, national & international media and diplomacy, which in 1993 helped him in communications for the Serb Republic, during the first UN sponsored Bosnia peace initiative in New York.


Twenty years later, a Life member and recruiter for the National Rifle Association of America, and a member of the Gun Owners of America, Miladinovic advocated in the U.S. for Canadians to be equal before the law.

Miladinovic ran for Kitchener mayor in the recent 2014 municipal elections on the platform:
•     maintaining police salary because of the risk factor until retirement, and also because prime candidates would apply, which would make the police brass job of firing bad constables easier because there is a line of applicants;
•        increasing revenue without increasing taxes;
•      increasing Kitchener housing and modify existing housing for those with mobility issues.

Miladinovic currently sits on the advisory committee Heritage Kitchener for the City of Kitchener.  He believes neighbourhoods are not communes, therefore no-one should tell the homeowner what to do with their property against their will.  He has supported all amicable agreements at the committee, except for one meeting in May 2015, where his voting didn’t go as planned because of the mass amount of properties in question and the speed of the vote; not that it mattered since he was the only one opposing.  Nevertheless, Miladinovic went to the following city council meeting, on a matter of principle, to correct his position in support of all home owners that were not in favour of having their homes listed as heritage.  Miladinovic maintains that your property belongs to you, and that laws in Ontario should not have been passed that take away homeowners’ property rights.


In July 2015, Miladinovic applied to become a Libertarian candidate for Kitchener Centre.  He was endorsed the following week, but the hard copy didn't arrive until September 16th.  Once it arrived, more than one hundred of Miladinovic's neighbours nominated him to the federal election ballot, and was confirmed a candidate by Elections Canada on September 24th.

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SLAVKO MILADINOVIĆ